andres marrugo

The Perils of Talking Too Much


photo credit: mkorsakov via photopin cc

All too often I see people who simply talk too much.1 Wether what they speak is nonsense or even meaningful things, there’s a limit to how much one can tolerate.

By talking too much – and too often – we miss out on many things. We don’t let others speak (which to my understanding is common courtesy), and worse of all we lose our capacity to empathize with others. We can’t read faces well while uttering words out of our mouths continuously. Loosing that feedback is what prompts us to speak without pause and with no care for what the people around us may feel. It’s what turns you into a prick. We’re just too focused on ourselves to care about others.

New Secularism


photo credit: Pablo Moroe via photopin cc.

Before Darwin it certainly was very difficult to be an atheist or a nonbeliever – that is, an intellectually fulfilled one.1 At least that’s how Richard Dawkins usually puts it and I quite agree with him. It was not that the scientific method2 didn’t exist at the time, it was that the mystery of life was too big a mystery to even consider tackling through the ways of science. Yet that was what Darwin did.

The topic of this post does not have to do with Darwin, at least in a direct sense. The other day I was listening to Point of Inquiry, a podcast from the center of inquiry.3 They had Frans de Waal on and he talked about his latest book The Bonobo and the Atheist. There was a moment during the interview that the host, Chris Mooney, referred to him as being an atheist to which he replied saying

A Book for My Son

In the latest Generational podcast episode Aaron Hillegass told Gabe that he wrote his Objective-C book with his ten-year-old in mind.

I found this to be quite interesting and truly inspiring. By writing the book “for his son,” he made sure anyone could actually read and understand it, but also he was deeply motivated to get it right. I wouldn’t want my son to read a crappy book.

If I ever had to write a guide about how to be (stay) motivated on a project this would definitely be there.

A Brave New World: The Joy of Discovery

This post is in fact a Day One entry. I treat my Day One journal as a sort of personal blog. A blog with a readership of one – at least in the present. What I mean to say is that, for the most part, I write about my life and for my kids, which are too young to read. I hope they read this in some distant future. I think that the things I might forget are probably the things they’ll want to know about. That is why I write.

Links of Interest for January 31, 2013

The “Links of Interest” is a type of post I’ll start to do on a regular basis here. Every now and then I come across something interesting in the web that I’d like to share with my readers, but that doesn’t necessarily merit a blog post or I really don’t have the time to write one. This type of blog post is inspired by Brett Terpstra’s “Web Excursions” system. As he explains, he prefers a single post with multiple links rather than a ton of individual “link list” posts. I do too.

To find out more about the details and the ruby script for automatically generating the post go to his website. The links posted here, I’ve gathered in the past couple of weeks using pinboard an incredibly useful bookmarking service. Enjoy.

Writing My Thoughts Down

iPod touch
photo credit: chiarashine via photopin cc

As is often the case, ideas come about in the most unexpected moments. Lately, I’ve found myself taking notes while walking to work, while waiting for a coffee in front of a bending machine, or like now while getting dressed for work.

It’s become a habit of mine to write what I think, when I think it. My iPod touch has enabled that. I could well have pen and paper with me at all times, but I’m not used to that and nothing beats the digital format.

Careless Email Writing

Text editing.
photo credit: Unhindered by Talent via photopin cc

I read the other day an email that desperately needed some editing. Writing without editing is pretty much the same as speaking with little attention to what we are saying. The great advantage of the written form over the spoken one is that you can go back an edit. Not editing what you write is both a poor use of the written form and a sign that you don’t care much for the person that will read your message.

‘Cooking’ Ideas

I love to cook – or one of the reasons I enjoy it so much is – because it’s a manual activity that, quite often, lets my mind wonder about. While cooking I can think about my problems,1 about the future, about a world different from this one. I can hear my thoughts in a undisturbed way. It is like a moment of pristine inspiration. Me and myself. Nobody else.

My Reflection in a Mirror of Prose

I like to write, for writing reminds me of who I am, who I want to be, and where I come from. It is no mistery that I enjoy it, but that doesn’t make it any easier.

I often get compliments on my writing, but still, I think there’s a long way to go before I feel more comfortable with it – I still struggle over single words or sentences.

Lately, I’ve been rediscovering myself in many different ways. I find myself more aware of everything – and that is probably not the most interesting thing – if not by chance, by fate, but I do feel different. I certainly am not the same person I was a while ago. I write more, which means I exit my body more often.

Four Paragraphs Long

I don’t really know what this post is about or even why I decided it should be blog post in the first place. All I can think is that I really liked it. I thought it would be interesting to share it with others. Not that it would be useful or anything, simply a pleasant read.

It’s not meant to mean anything in particular – at least in any philosophical way. It’s just something I conjured up the other day before going to bed. After I read it a couple of times, I knew it was a true gem. Only four paragraphs long, yet so deep with frustration and love. The love of a father towards his son, and of those little – apparently insignificant – moments that stick with you for the rest of your life. Here it is.

A very short midnight story

It’s almost midnight and I can’t really prevent my eyes from closing. I’m tired as hell, yet I can’t seem to convince myself into the idea that I should get some sleep.

I don’t have a big day tomorrow or anything, it’s just that my kid wakes up so goddamn early. Well, that’s what he’s supposed to do, and I can’t find an argument against that – at least a plausible one.

Sometimes he just stays awake, lying there in my regular-sized bed, staring at me directly into my eyes, even though I have them closed, like waiting for the slightest hint of evidence that I too, am awake.

At the first sight of a blink, he launches himself toward me. “Papa, papa,” he shouts with excitement. I open my eyes wide, he sticks his finger in one of them – it hurts.